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Jane Hoop Elementary
Jane Hoop Elementary logo
Directed by Steven Spilerg (1-2)
Francis Lawrence (3)
Chris Weitz (4)
Gary Ross (5-8)
Produced by Derek Todd (1-8)
Drake Jones (1-8)
Steven Spilberg (1-4)
Gary Ross (5, 7-8)
Rita Christensen (7-8)
Written by Brian Clark
Story by Rita Christensen
Based on Jane Hoop Elementary
Starring Blake Brown
Ben Linkin
Amy Tammie
Brandon Simpson
Bloom Dee
see below
Music by Hans Zimmer (1-3)
James Horner (4)
David Arnold (5-6)
James Newton Howard (7-8)
Cinematography Brad Jones (1-3)
Andrew Vanish (4-5)
Kyle Adams (6-8)
Editing by Dan Kroger (1-8)
Production company Spyglass Enterniment
Distributed by Paramount Pictures
Release dates 2000-2011
Running time 1162 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $1.4 billion
Box office $7.7 billion

Jane Hoop Elementary are the superhero feature film series, based on the popular Jane Hoop Elementary novel series by Rita Christensen. The series, distributed by Paramount Pictures, contains all eight superhero films beginning with Jane Hoop Elementary: The First (2000) and concluded with Jane Hoop Elementary: The Final Rush - Part 2 (2011). A spin-off series will contain a series of five films, beginning with Heroes Forever: The New Beginning (2016), again directed by Gary Ross, who directs the final four films of the original series. This creates the beginning of a shared universe media known as Rita Christensen's Superhero Saga.

Derek Todd and Drake Jones become producers for all eight films, but each films gets four different directors; Steven Spielberg, Francis Lawrence, Chris Weitz and Ross. Blake Brown, Ben Linkin, Amy Tammie, Brandon Simpson and Bloom Dee stars as the leading characters in all eight films. Production took eleven years to complete, as the story follows five young kids protecting the world from their nemesis Dr. Catwoman.

Jane Hoop Elementary: The Final Rush, the seventh and final installment, is divided into two seperated feature-length films. Part 1 was released in November 2010 and Part 2 was released in July 2011.

Five out of eight films are among the top 50, while Jane Hoop Elementary: The Final Rush - Part 2, the highest-grossing film in the series, remain as one of the top 20 highest-grossing films of all-time, ranking number 11. The film series are also a critical success. As of 2016, it is the second highest-grossing film series of all-time grossing over $7.728 billion worldwide behind only the Marvel Universe film series.

Origins

In 1996, right after the book was released, Warner Bros. has rights to put up plans onto developing a film adaptation and said that it'll take 10 years to developed it into a film.[1] In 1997, while setting the film to release in fall 1998, but there were no search of young actors who are playing the children heroes in the film, as they decided to cancel the search, so Warner Bros. canceled the deal and Christensen became disappointed about the report. Meanwhile, Christensen has been working on her project for two years, and told Paramount Pictures to develop the book to become a film. The film was now officially research and begins searching for child actors to play as Danny, Rebecca, Alec, Cory and Jaquille, and they found them,[1] Blake Brown, Ben Linkin and Amy Tammie. Linkin and Tammie both made their acting debuts.

Film Producers Eduardo Verastegui and Sean Wolfington at the Chopard Party in Cannes

Todd and Jones became film producers for all eight iflms since 1998.

In January 1999, writer Brian Clark has the rights to put the film adaptations into works. He admits that he is very nervous about making a very successful book into a movie, because he has never been a film writer before, and has spend most of his life writing small films. Christensen praises that Clark will do good becoming a film writer, and Clark express his interest saying: "I'll do it! I know I can!" Christensen joins Clark by writing the film, as Christensen is wating the film to be very loveable and childlike for her fans, since they read the books. She also hopes that this film will feel like that the book itself has become to life, so that young children could feel like that they want to become superheroes like the characters from Jane Hoop Elementary were. Two producers, Derek Todd and Drake Jones, have intersted in producing the film, and Christensen express their interest stating: "these two handsome guys are a match! And I love them." Todd, Jones, Chirstensen and Clark had a meeting with the studio Paramount Pictures for over 2 hours about wanting to make a big budget movie. Christensen was very nervous about it.

"It took like 30 directors to find the perfect fit, and when I met James, he truely got me crying of joy, because he loved reading the books, even though he is an adult. Some adults can ready children's book, and could feel like how they could express their emotionals about my story. So I call James as director for Jane Hoop Elementary."
Rita Christensen on choosing Steven Spielberg as director

Meanwhile, James Cameron has previously been choosen to become film director for the first film. However, his place has been turned down as he is in the works of director another film, due to schedule conflicts. Other films that are included in the list for Christensen are Bryan Singer, Zack Snyder, Christopher Nolan, Gore Verbinski, Steven Spielberg, George Lucas, J. J. Abrams, Peter Jackson, Tim Burton, Brett Ratner and Michael Bay. Christen has choosen Singer, Nolan, Abrams, Spielberg and Lucas as her top five for being a film director. In July 1999, it was announced that Spielberg will be directing the film, and Christensen also has choosen him as her number one choose, after seeing his name when he directed films like Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981), Back to the Future (1985) and Jurassic Park (1993).

Before Spielberg was choosen, he read the Jane Hoop Elementary books to his children, who wants Spielberg to read them a bedtime story. Afterwards, he gained expression and finishes up reading the book to himself, and told his wife that "this is the most perfect book I have ever read to the kids. I heard that they are making a movie, and I hope that I should be the lucky one to be a director." Indeed, Calvin is very excited to meet up with Christensen, after she chosen Spielberg as film director. He told Christensen: "You make my kids feel like that they also want to be superheroes like them, and I feel like, when I was a kid, I always want to be a superhero and make the world safe from evil." Christenen got the goosbumps what Spielberg told her about it, and she is looking foward to have him as director.

After three more books were released, Spielberg told Christensen: "If we are making two more films, I will be directing all three of them, and I will let make my kids to go to the movies and see them. They loved the books, so they also should love the movies." Spielberg wants each films to be much darker and edgier than the first film, because the characters are getting older, same thing for Christensen, stating: "If I keep making books in years, I will be making the characters older. If I was making movies, I will do the same things, because I can't see characters staying as young kids forever, and I don't want anyone else playing the characters, because I have a feeling that I could have critisms about different actors playing characters."

Production

Filming for the franchise took place in Cincinnati, OH, as the green screen scenes were shot at the studio in Cleveland, OH. It took place in November 1999 until December 2010, 11 years of filming the series.

Motion Picture Main Producer Director Screenwriter Novel by Rita Christensen
Jane Hoop Elementary: The First (2000) Derek Todd
Drake Jones
Steven Spielberg Derek Todd
Drake Jones
Jane Hoop Elementary: The First (1996)
Jane Hoop Elementary: The Cyber Escape (2001) Jane Hoop Elementary: The Cyber Escape (1997)
Jane Hoop Elementary: Goldenman's Revenge (2003) Francis Lawrence Jane Hoop Elementary: Goldenman's Revenge (1999)
Jane Hoop Elementary: The Magic Ball (2005) Chris Weitz Jane Hoop Elementary: The Magic Ball (2000)
Jane Hoop Elementary: Morphin the Power (2007) Gary Ross Jane Hoop Elementary: Morphin the Power (2001)
Jane Hoop Elementary: Turbo of Catland (2009) Jane Hoop Elementary: Turbo of Catland (2003)
Jane Hoop Elementary: The Final Rush - Part 1 (2010) Jane Hoop Elementary: The Final Rush (2005)
Jane Hoop Elementary: The Final Rush - Part 2 (2011)

Directors

After finishing Jane Hoop Elementary: The First, Spielberg returns to direct the second installment, The Cyber Escape. After that, is originally scheduled to become film director for all of the Jane Hoop Elementary films, but the contract has since been scrapped due to Spielberg's schedule conflicts. But, he did manage to come back as film producer. Christensen was disappointed for Spielberg's departure from being film director, stating that "he is the most wonderful director I have ever worked with". Paramount Pictures considers a replacement for Spielberg for being a film director for Goldenman's Revenge. Meanwhile, Francis Lawrence has been chosen to direct Goldenman's Revenge replacing Spielberg. Lawrence was nervous because he has never heard of Jane Hoop Elementary films or read the books. After reading the books and seeing the films, he eventually signed up as director.

For the fourth installment The Magic Ball, Chris Weitz was chosen to direct after Lawrence, director of Goldenman's Revenge, confirms that he won't be back as director for the fourth installment. Steven Spielberg, Drake Jones and Derek Todd will be returning as film produces, and Brian Clark will be back as a film writer. It is Spielberg's final time producing the Jane Hoop Elementary films.

Gary-ross

Gary Ross directed the most Jane Hoop Elementary films, including a two-part Jane Hoop Elementary finale.

Gary Ross was chosen as director of Morphin the Power after Chris Weitz's offers was turned down. Derek Todd and Drake Jones returns as film producers, and Brian Clark returns as film writer. But before Ross is chosen to return as director for sixth installment, Turbo of Catland, he is unsure if he could be back any time to direct the last two films. Paramount Pictures might choose Andrew Adamson as film director if Ross indeed will not be back. He direct films like The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, Shrek, Shrek 2 and The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian.[1] As many directors, such as James Cameron, George Lucas, Zack Snyder and Bryan Singer, has chosen to replace Ross as the film director for Turbo of Catland, all of them are denial on Christensen's list. Eventually, Ross has returned to direct The Final Rush - Part 1 and The Final Rush - Part 2.

In result, Ross direct most of the Jane Hoop Elementary films. He direct four films (Morphin the Power, Turbo of Catland and both The Final Rush parts), while Spielberg directs two films (The First and The Cyber Escape), and both Lawrence (Goldenman's Revegne) and Weitz (The Magic Ball) direct only one Hoop film.

Cast members

Main article: List of Jane Hoop Elementary cast members
Ben Linkin, Amy Tammie and Blake Brown at JHE8 Premiere

Linkin, Tammie and Brown, who attended the world premiere of Jane Hoop Elementary: The Final Rush - Part 2 on June 30, 2011 in New York City, appear as the main characters in all eight films as well as Simpson and Dee.

Christensen wants to choose only American cast for the film in 1996. She worked with four different directors Spielberg, Lawerence, Weitz and Ross, screenplayer Brian Clark and producers Derek Todd and Drake Jones, and they spend over two years searching for young actors to play as the main characters, and it was a tough scheduled to search for them. In July 1999, it was confirmed that newcomers Blake Brown, Ben Linkin and Amy Tammie, Brandon Simpson and Bloom Dee were choosen for the role as Danny, Alec, Rebecca, Cory and Jaquille. All five cast members portrays their roles in all eight films. However, Tammie considered on not returning as her role as Rebecca until Turbo of Catland but she eventually changed her mind and does not want to see anyone else to play Rebecca, stating "leaving Jane Hoop Elementary without finishing up is the worst idea of my career". However, rumors confirmed that Tammie indeed will not return. Christensen responses to rumors: "It will not feel like home without Amy. I have no interest in seeing another young actress to play Rebecca. It just does not fit well. The only thing I want a young actress to play Rebecca is... Amy. End of story."

Aside the three actors, the other actors were Barbara Blue as Naudia Gorden, Arthur Walters as Goldenman, Natasha Richardson as Mrs. Bella Watson, George Jones as Mayor James Watson, Brooke Timer as Dr. Catwoman, Rebecca Dee as Shego Dalma, Stephen Johnson as Shadow the Monkeyman.[1] Others includes Logan Lerman as Kirk Waters, Nick Richards as David Johnson, Jessica Alder as Maria Dawns, Elliot Martinson as Michael Walker, Keira Knightley as Belle Lamar, Lisa Black as Alice Kingston, Michael Shanks as Don Kingston, Jami Gertz as Dacia, Tim Allen as Evan, Jennette McCurdy as Catgirl, Miley Cyrus as Heather Woods, Nick Jonas as Luke Watson, Joe Jonas as Catboy and Emma Watson as the young Bella Lamar.[1]

English actress Natasha Richardson played the character Mrs. Bella Watson for the first six films. But on March 18 2009, four months before Jane Hoop Elementary: Turbo of Catland was released, Richardson died from a traumatic brain injury after being involved in a skiing accident, and Paramount Pictures considered a replacement for the role as Mrs. Bella Watson just after they begin filming Jane Hoop Elementary: The Final Rush. On April 2009, about a month after her death, another English actress Miranda Richardson replaced Natasha Richardson for the role, and began filming that same month after she was cast.

Final Filming

Filming for franchises and both parts of the final film wrapped up on June 25, 2010, ending ten years of work of the entire film franchise.[1] Blake Brown, Amy Tammie and Ben Linkin started filming on the last day.[1] The film is shot for a year and a half from January, 2009 to June, 2010.[1] However, reshoots of the epilogue is said to take place around fall 2010. The scene was filmed on November 19, 2010, which official marks the closure of eleven years of filming all of the Jane Hoop Elementary franchise.

Soundtrack

Main article: Music of the Jane Hoop Elementary films
640px-Hans Zimmer 2010

Hans Zimmer compose music for the first three films in the series.

All eight soundtracks have different composers. German composer Hans Zimmer composed the first three films, The First (2000), The Cyber Escape (2001) and Goldenman's Revenge (2003). James Horner composes The Magic Ball (2005). English composer David Arnold composes Morphin the Power (2007) and Turbo of Catland (2009). And finally, James Newton Howard composes The Final Rush - Part 1 (2010) and The Final Rush - Part 2 (2011).

  1. Jane Hoop Elementary: The First (2000), composed and conducted by Hans Zimmer (1)
  2. Jane Hoop Elementary: The Cyber Escape (2001), composed and conducted by Hans Zimmer (2)
  3. Jane Hoop Elementary: Goldenman's Revenge (2003), composed and conducted by Hans Zimmer (3)
  4. Jane Hoop Elementary: The Magic Ball (2005), composed and conducted by James Horner
  5. Jane Hoop Elementary: Morphin the Power (2007), composed and conducted by David Arnold (1)
  6. Jane Hoop Elementary: Turbo of Catland (2009), composed and conducted by David Arnold (2)
  7. Jane Hoop Elementary: The Final Rush - Part 1 (2010), composed and conducted by James Newton Howard (1)
  8. Jane Hoop Elementary: The Final Rush - Part 2 (2011), composed and conducted by James Newton Howard (2)

Main series

Jane Hoop Elementary: The First (2000)

Main article: Jane Hoop Elementary: The First (film)
Janehoopbase

Jane Hoop Elementary Base as first introduced in the first film.

Danny, Alec, Rebecca, Cory and Jaquille has begin the adventure. Five children are starting their first day at elementary school in kindergarten, where they are being taken into the mysterious building, known to be the home of the Mayor's dorm appartment for young children for shelter called Jane Hoop Elementary, named after the kids' elementary school they attend. This is due to the fact that they gained powers from The First since they were all little, and did not know it, and have not used them ever since. Now that the kids have powers, they could use them to save the world and fight against their first enemey, Dr. Catwoman.

Jane Hoop Elementary: The Cyber Escape (2001)

Main article: Jane Hoop Elementary: The Cyber Escape (film)

Danny and his friend experience the world inside the video game where Catwoman hacks up the entire game which causes for it to transform into a dangerous world which lead her to use it to attack the game world teleporting to the real world. They also experience that Danny's longtime friend Kirk Waters has gone missing and trapped into the game forever.

Jane Hoop Elementary: Goldenman's Revenge (2003)

Main article: Jane Hoop Elementary: Goldenman's Revenge (film)

Danny wins his first award, meanwhile, Catwoman, Shego and Monkeyman sneaks into the Base, starts to stole the Golden Trophy. Catwoman transforms a trophy into a man cover in gold, Goldenman. Meanwhile Mayor, Miss. Watson and SWAT finds out Goldenman is a godfather, meanwhile Cory, Jaquille and Naudia were kidnapped. Miss. Watson finds he is Danny's, Danny and Rebecca were right to make him break out of prison as a hero.

Jane Hoop Elementary: The Magic Ball (2005)

Main article: Jane Hoop Elementary: The Magic Ball (film)

Danny, Alec, Rebecca and the gang discovers that the mysterious ball, entitled The Magic Ball, could perform anything magical after each person performs at least three wishes. Although, Catwoman hears about it and is threaten to use to take over the world and tear Danny's friendship apart.

Jane Hoop Elementary: Morphin the Power (2007)

Main article: Jane Hoop Elementary: Morphin the Power (film)
Morphin the power

Morphin the Power was first introduced in the third film, but appeared again in the fourth, mainly in the fifth film also, and the last three films

Dr. Catwoman unleashed Goldenman's half-brother in law who joined the dark side. He helped her conquer the world unleashes the evil version of the heroes. Stronger than them, Danny, Alec, Rebecca, Cory and Jaquille's powers begin to lose their powers to their evil selves, and Evan drains Goldenman's powers as well, and slowly dying. The heroes than traveled to the lost forest-island, Morphin the Power, which they already went two times. They were search for the "Crystal Power" to help Goldenman, and have new powers to rescue the world, Alice saves all parents.

Jane Hoop Elementary: Turbo of Catland (2009)

Main article: Jane Hoop Elementary: Turbo of Catland (film)

Danny's friendship with Jane Hoop Elementary goes awry. After making a mistake for leaving them behind since the previous year where he decides to retire, he is back as leader of Jane Hoop Elementary and now is in a relationship with Rebecca. Catwoman has given a dangerous assignment to her daughter Catgirl as she flirts with Danny, leading him to join Catwoman's side, meaning that it will be the end of his friendship with Jane Hoop Elementary and his romantic interest with Rebecca. Meanwhile, Jane Hoop Elementary realizes that Catwoman's new plan will be worse than ever as they will be unleashing a dark and dangerous weapon to destroy the world if Catwoman's current plans failed.

Jane Hoop Elementary: The Final Rush - Part 1 (2010)

Main article: Jane Hoop Elementary: The Final Rush - Part 1

Catwoman raises her army and releases the dangerous Final Rush, where the world is no longer a safe place as it used to be. Danny, Rebecca and Alec goes on a hunt to find three powerful objects to give them the most ultimate superpower that is powerful enough to destroy it, while Cory is now in charge as leader of Jane Hoop Elementary.

Jane Hoop Elementary: The Final Rush - Part 2 (2011)

Main article: Jane Hoop Elementary: The Final Rush - Part 2

Continuing where Part 1 left off at, the Crystal Power shatters into three pieces and disappears, so Danny, Rebecca and Alec will have to go yet on another adventure to three different places to search all three pieces before Catwoman finds them and destroy the Final Rush to stop Catwoman's plans once and for all. They also prepare for the final battle against Catwoman and her army, which took place in the city of Cincinnati.

Distribution

Marketing

All of these video games were based onto the film franchise with the same name. It also features spin-off video games.

Release

After the release of the fourth book, Jane Hoop Elementary: The Magic Ball in July 2000, Jane Hoop Elementary: The First was released on November 10, 2000. It broked box office records grossing $85 million alone during its opening weekend premiere. It than ranked as the number one film of 2000 worldwide with $972 million. With the success of the first film, Paramount Pictures greenlighted sequels, and they became more popularity at the critics and fans, and less demand at the box office domestically, internationally and worldwide, with the exception of the final film.

The fifth film Jane Hoop Elementary: Morphin the Power was released worldwide on July 4, 2007. The sixth film Jane Hoop Elementary: Turbo of Catland was released worldwide on July 8, 2009. The final book Jane Hoop Elementary: The Final Rush was split into two theatrical parts: Part 1 was released on November 12, 2010, and Part 2 released on July 8, 2011, eight months after Part 1. Part 1 is originally going to be released in 3D, but Paramount Picutres anonunced that it will only be shown in 2D and IMAX formats, due to the 3D effects not found. Part 2, however, will be released in both 2D and 3D formats. It was later reported that both parts will not be in 3D at all, and both are yet to release in regular and IMAX theaters all together. Although, the planned for releasing Part 2 in 3D is still in development. Part 1 surprised The First at the international box office, while Part 2 surprised The First, domestically and worldwide, and also Part 1 internationally.

The longest film in the franchise is the second, The Cyber Escape at 160 minutes, while the shortest film in the franchise is the eighth and final film, The Final Rush: Part 2 at 128 minutes.

Home media

The completed series were released on December 23, 2011, alongside the release of the final installment, Jane Hoop Elementary: The Final Rush - Part 2.

Reaction

Critical responses

All of the films were a financial success, marking them as a major Hollowood tent-poles akin to Harry Potter, James Bond, Star Wars, Indiana Jones and Pirates of the Caribbean. Fans are divided throughout the release of each films, about it's appperances and changes as well as new comers and some new writers. Fans are also divided up with their reaction of the same film director James Calvin for all of them. Author Rita Christensen states that The Final Rush is her favorite book so far.

Review aggregate results

Film Rotten Tomatoes Metacritic Yahoo! Movies
Overall Top Critics Critics
Jane Hoop Elementary: The First 77% (246 reviews) 77% (7 reviews) 76% (17 reviews) A
Jane Hoop Elementary: The Cyber Escape 82% (262-300 reviews) 81% (17 reviews) 86% (18 reviews) A
Jane Hoop Elementary: Goldenman's Revenge 90% (262-300 reviews) 87% (17 reviews) 82% (18 reviews) A
Jane Hoop Elementary: The Magic Ball 92% (246 reviews) 89% (13 reviews) 81% (23 reviews) A+
Jane Hoop Elementary: Morphin the Power 80% (257 reviews) 71% (14 reviews) 68% (21 reviews) A-
Jane Hoop Elementary: Turbo of Catland 81% (268 reviews) 82% (16 reviews) 72% (24 reviews) A-
Jane Hoop Elementary: The Final Rush - Part 1 79% (275 reviews) 68% (16 reviews) 65% (24 reviews) A-
Jane Hoop Elementary: The Final Rush - Part 2 95% (316 reviews) 100% (21 reviews) 89% (33 reviews) A+

Box office

The films became the second highest-grossing film series of all-time behind the Marvel Universe film series. The highest-grossing film domestically, internationally and worldwide in the franchise is Jane Hoop Elementary: The First. All of them are being overtaken by the concluding film, The Final Rush: Part 2. The lowest grossing film in the series is Goldenman's Revenge, domestically, overseas and worldwide, while the lowest opening weekend in the series is Morphin the Power.

Film Release date Box office revenue Budget Reference
United States Foreign Worldwide
Jane Hoop Elementary: The First November 10, 2000 $311,414,828 $661,461,755 $972,876,583 $125,000,000 [1]
Jane Hoop Elementary: The Cyber Escape November 9, 2001 $265,595,950 $611,319,788 $876,915,738 $100,000,000 [1]
Jane Hoop Elementary: Goldenman's Revenge November 14, 2003 $252,537,541 $543,871,452 $795,409,933 $130,000,000 [1]
Jane Hoop Elementary: The Magic Ball November 11, 2005 $290,929,197 $604,558,868 $895,488,065 $150,000,000 [1]
Jane Hoop Elemenetary: Morphin the Power July 4, 2007 $292,804,616 $657,096,717 $949,901,333 $200,000,000 [1]
Jane Hoop Elementary: Turbo of Catland July 8, 2009 $302,839,428 $642,457,514 $945,296,942 $250,000,000 [1]
Jane Hoop Elementary: The Final Rush - Part 1 November 12, 2010 $297,294,949 $668,000,000 $965,294,949 $250,000,000 [1]
Jane Hoop Elementary: The Final Rush - Part 2 July 8, 2011 $380,025,057 $949,000,000 $1,329,025,057 [1]
Total $2,393,441,566 $5,336,766,094 $7,728,831,783 $1,205,000,000 [1]

All-time ranks

Motion Picture Rank
All time worldwide All time United States All time North America (adjusted) Yearly
(domestic)
Yearly
(international)
Opening Day
(all-time)
Opening Weekend
(all-time)
The First #36 #61 #72 #1 #1 #45 #25
The Cyber Escape #62 #77 #108 #4 #2 #42 #21
Goldenman's Revenge #72 #84 #141 #5 #2 #27 #19
The Magic Ball #54 #85 #111 #3 #2 #26 #20
Morphin the Power #47 #78 #127 #5 #1 #22 #26
Turbo of Catland #48 #69 #147 #3 #2 #12 #25
The Final Rush – Part 1 #40 #73 #180 #5 #2 #7 #7
The Final Rush – Part 2 #11 #32 #85 #2 #2 #2 #2

See also

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